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Our people

As at 30 June 2018, we had a staff of 791 (Australian Public Service employees and statutory office holders) supplemented by 31 secondees from Commonwealth, state and territory law enforcement and other Commonwealth agencies.26

Our workforce includes investigators and intelligence analysts, financial profilers, operational and organisational psychologists, physical and technical surveillance operatives, technical and cyber analytics operatives, lawyers, specialist examinations staff, business and systems analysts, information architects, project and program managers and corporate services staff.

We work with secondees from our partner agencies, some of whom are seconded to the ACIC to work in multi-agency task forces and Joint Analyst Groups. We also engage contractors and consultants to provide specialised services.

STAFFING PROFILE AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

STAFFING CATEGORIES

NUMBER OF STAFF

NUMBER OF FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENT STAFF

AVERAGE STAFFING LEVEL DURING 2017–18

APS employees Statutory office holders

791

757.46

749.06

Secondees funded by the ACIC

17

17

17

Secondees funded by jurisdictions

14

14

14

Total core staff

822

788.46

780.06

Task force members

101

   

Total overall staff

923

788.46

780.06

Notes:

  1. This table reflects the number of secondees as at 30 June 2018. However, as secondees work with us for different periods of time throughout the year, the overall total of secondees for 2017–18 was 223.
  2. Task force members cannot be accurately reflected in full-time equivalent and average staffing level numbers.
  3. The average staffing level is provided for June 2018.
  4. Further information on consultants is provided in Chapter 4: Financial performance.

SECONDEES AND TASK FORCES

  • Secondees—As at 30 June 2018, we had a total of 31 secondees, both ACIC-funded and funded by other agencies. Throughout the reporting year we hosted a total of 59 secondees from 18 other Commonwealth and law enforcement agencies on short-term and long-term assignment.
  • Task forces—We coordinate and participate in joint task forces and Joint Analyst Groups (JAG) with partner agencies. As at 30 June 2018 we had 101 task force members. Throughout the reporting year we hosted 164 task force members from 13 other Commonwealth and law enforcement agencies on short-term and long-term assignment.

A breakdown of secondees and task force staff by home agency and jurisdiction as at 30 June 2018 is in Appendix E on pages 236–239.

STAFFING PROFILE TRENDS 2010–11 TO 2017–18

HEADCOUNT AS AT 30 JUNE

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

APS and statutory office holders

628

598

584

562

581

595

810

791

Secondees funded by the ACC/ACIC

45

23

21

23

23

14

14

17

Secondees funded by other jurisdictions

19

15

20

20

13

11

10

14

Total core staff

692

636

625

605

617

620

834

822

Task force and JAG members

18

13

21

46

35

82

100

101

Total overall available resources

710

649

646

651

652

702

934

923

Full-time equivalent (APS only)

606.61

565.21

553.94

532.98

550.8

561.20

761.25

757.465

Average staffing level (APS only)

na

556.29

553.35

531.57

529.8

554.81

757.69

749.06

LOCATION

During the year, our staff were based in eight locations around the country and several overseas locations.

Note: This diagram represents the locations where ACIC staff were based as at 30 June 2018.

APS EMPLOYEES AND STATUTORY OFFICE HOLDERS BY LOCATION AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

LOCATION

NUMBER

Canberra

391

Sydney

130

Melbourne

113

Brisbane

90

Adelaide

36

Perth

26

Darwin

2

Hobart

2

London

1

The Hague

1

Washington

2

A breakdown of employment capacity by location is in Appendix E on page 236–239.

CLASSIFICATION LEVELS

We have 11 different classification levels including APS 1–6, Executive Levels 1 and 2 (EL1 and EL2), Senior Executive Service bands 1 and 2 (SES 1 and SES 2) and our CEO and Examiners, who are statutory office holders.

APS EMPLOYEES BY CLASSIFICATION LEVEL AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

CLASSIFICATION LEVEL

NUMBER

APS 1

1

APS 2

2

APS 3

29

APS 4

115

APS 5

101

APS 6

145

EL 1

291

EL 2

87

SES 1

13

SES 2

3

CEO

1

Examiners

3

Note: These figures represent positions that were substantively filled as at 30 June 2018.

A breakdown of classifications in our different locations is in Appendix E on pages 236–239.

GENDER

This year, women comprised 49.4 per cent of our organisation. There are 128 more women than men at classification levels APS 1–6, but 134 more men than women at the EL1, EL2 and SES levels.

APS EMPLOYEES BY GENDER AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

GENDER

NUMBER

Men

399

Women

390

X/Indeterminate

2

A breakdown of gender distribution by classification is in Appendix E on pages 236–239.

AGE

Our age profile includes strong representation in all age brackets, which range from under 21 to over 65 years of age.

CULTURAL DIVERSITY

A total of 15.90 per cent of staff have identified that Australia is not their country of birth and 14.79 per cent do not have English as a first language, while 10.99 per cent chose not to give this information.

WORKPLACE DIVERSITY

We encourage staff to respect and value the skills and experiences of all staff members and we are increasingly responsive to the additional challenges faced by some groups. We are committed to creating an environment focused on building a diverse workforce to better deliver on our purpose of making Australia safer.

The Diversity and Inclusion Sub-committee meets quarterly and oversees our workplace diversity program. Members of the Executive actively promote, participate in and support initiatives to improve diversity awareness and inclusivity within our workforce. During 2017–18 the Diversity and Inclusion Sub-committee developed and implemented four 2017–19 Diversity Action Plans focusing on:

  • people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • people with disability
  • gender equity
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN

Our Reconciliation Action Plan 2018–20 was launched on 19 April 2018. The new Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) was endorsed by Reconciliation Australia and outlines our continued commitment to progressing reconciliation between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians. Our RAP outlines specific actions we will take to foster respectful and productive relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. In implementing the RAP, we will make a meaningful contribution to reconciliation in Australia and to increasing awareness and understanding of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

We are committed to increasing mutual respect between Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees through an inclusive work environment. Two of the ACIC Executive were active champions for the inclusion of Indigenous Australians and implementation of the RAP. Through 2017–18 we have:

  • commissioned an Indigenous artist to produce an artwork for the Reconciliation Action Plan 2018–20 and hung the artwork, along with other Indigenous artworks, in prominent places throughout our offices
  • celebrated and promoted the launch of the Reconciliation Action Plan 2018–20, National Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week, and provided opportunities to increase awareness and strengthen relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees and other employees
  • seen the uptake and use of protocols and guidelines on Acknowledgement of Country and invited Elders to perform a Welcome to Country for larger events
  • increased employment pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into the ACIC by continuing to participate in the entry level programs, the Indigenous Australian Government Development Program and the APS Indigenous Graduate Program
  • increased staff knowledge and awareness of Indigenous communities by continuing to participate in the Jawun secondment program.

Our RAP Working Group met monthly to develop the Reconciliation Action Plan 2018–20 and implement actions.

Our rate of Indigenous employment is 1.64 per cent.

DISABILITY

A total of 2.40 per cent of staff have identified as having a disability and 10.49 per cent chose not to give this information. We have renewed our Australian Network on Disability membership and upgraded to silver membership, to enable development of strategies to improve workplace inclusivity for employees and stakeholders with disability.

The National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. These reports can be found at <www.dss.gov.au>.

CULTURE STRATEGY

We are committed to a culture that strives for excellence, enables personal and professional growth, values diversity, models respectful behaviour, and achieves agency unity through collaboration and inclusiveness. This year we continued to implement our culture strategy to foster an inclusive, positive and productive working environment.

Our culture strategy is informed by and aligns with the:

  • ACIC Enterprise Agreement 2016–19
  • ACIC respect in the workplace charter
  • ACIC Strategic Plan 2016–21
  • Public Service Act 1999 instruments and guidelines relating to workplace values in the public service, work health and safety, and performance management principles.

REMUNERATION AND BENEFITS

WORKPLACE AGREEMENTS

During 2017–18 our ACIC Enterprise Agreement 2016–19 covered all APS employees (this does not include our substantive SES or Examiners). This agreement commenced on 30 December 2016. It provides a range of flexible working arrangements and aligns key ACIC conditions with APS-wide conditions.

PERFORMANCE PAYMENTS

Our agency does not have a system of performance payments. Rather, incremental advancement is available to eligible staff as part of our performance development system (see Performance development on page 180).

NON-SALARY BENEFITS

Non-salary benefits include flexible working arrangements for APS 1–6 officers,
time-off-in-lieu arrangements for Executive Level staff, tertiary studies assistance and a comprehensive Performance Development System (see page 180). We also offer free influenza vaccinations, and an employee assistance program providing counselling and support for staff and family members.

SALARY RANGES

Salaries for APS employees range from $44,153 (APS 1) to $138,295 (EL 2).

SALARY BANDS UNDER OUR ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT 2016–19

CLASSIFICATION LEVEL

SALARY AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

APS 1

$44,153 –$48,799

APS 2

$50,722–$56,245

APS 3

$58,681–$63,334

APS 4

$64,501–$70,035

APS 5

$71,148–$75,731

APS 6

$77,924–$88,183

EL 1

$98,244–$118,443

EL 2

$122,744–$138,295

EXECUTIVE REMUNERATION

The nature and amount of remuneration for SES officers is determined through the ACIC Senior Executive Service Remuneration and Benefits Policy. SES salary increases take into account the complexity of the role, current and previous performance, contribution to corporate goals and values, the financial position of the ACIC, comparisons with other SES officers and the quantum of remuneration relative to other ACIC staff. The ACIC uses Common Law Contracts for all SES employees to govern remuneration and entitlements. Details of SES total remuneration are in the financial statements (see pages 196–217).

CEO AND EXAMINERS REMUNERATION

As our CEO and ACIC Examiners are statutory office holders, the Remuneration Tribunal sets their remuneration and entitlements. As at 30 June 2018, the CEO total remuneration package was $506,060.

The ACIC Examiner total remuneration package was $452,790. Part-time Examiners receive a daily rate of $1,440.

STAFF RETENTION AND TURNOVER

In 2017–18 a total of 130 staff left the agency. Reasons included moving to another APS agency, retirement, redundancies and completing non-ongoing contracts.

APS STAFF TURNOVER AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

TERMINATION REASON

NUMBER

Completed non-ongoing contract

6

Early termination of non-ongoing contract

1

External promotion

2

External transfer

25

Invalidity retirement

1

Move to other agency

23

Resignation

50

Retired after age 55

10

Section 29(3)(c) of the Public Service Act (poor performance)

1

Involuntary redundancy

1

Voluntary redundancy

10

As at 30 June 2018, our retention rate was 87.3 per cent.

Our staff retention strategies include:

  • recognition and performance development
  • performance feedback and support
  • learning and development opportunities
  • mentoring
  • opportunities for higher duties
  • involvement in cross-directorate projects
  • short-term transfers to other business areas
  • ongoing evaluation of feedback provided through staff surveys and exit surveys.

PERFORMANCE DEVELOPMENT

Our Performance Development System incorporates career planning, individual and team-based learning and development, capability and skills enhancement and regular performance feedback. This system guides our performance management process and is based on strategic links between business goals and key result areas when identifying opportunities for individual development.

In 2017–18, our Performance Development System completion rate was 94 per cent.

Our Performance Development System enables salary advancement for eligible employees. Employees are assessed against a three-point scale (high performing, performing well or requires improvement) and are eligible for salary advancement within their classification salary range if they receive a rating of high performing or performing well.

Managers are supported with guidance on the more formal aspects of the performance management process, including any identified under-performance. Managers and employees are supported through coaching to maintain appropriate focus on the issues at hand, strategies to manage any concerns about the process, strategies to contain and address issues that may emerge within teams as a result of individual performance management and experienced case managers to assist if required. Our Organisational Psychology services area also provides a point of referral for employees for access to appropriate support when necessary.

LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

STRATEGIES

Our learning and development strategies support capability development in identified priority areas. The objective is to develop a responsive and high performing workforce so we can deliver on our strategic direction and priorities.

APPROACH

Our learning and development activities are based on a blended learning and development philosophy, which recognises that experience within the workplace provides for the most effective learning, when blended with learning from others through coaching and mentoring, and formal learning opportunities. This learning approach follows the 70:20:10 learning philosophy.

70% LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE

  • work assignments
  • projects
  • problem solving
  • job rotation
  • higher duties
  • stretch assignments
  • community involvement
  • teach someone else
  • research widely
  • self-reflection

20% LEARNING FROM OTHERS

  • coaching
  • mentoring
  • seeking feedback
  • observing
  • social events
  • networks
  • professional memberships
  • shadowing
  • powerful professional development discussions

10% FORMAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

  • courses
  • seminars
  • conferences
  • online learning
  • tertiary study
  • self-directed learning

OPPORTUNITIES

We provide learning and development opportunities in three key areas:

  • Core—We provide learning activities to support positive workplace culture and fundamental organisational practices for employees to work successfully in the ACIC environment. Examples include induction, APS Core Skills programs, culture strategies, systems training, performance development training and project management courses.
  • Specialist—We work with internal subject matter experts, partner agencies and tertiary institutions to provide job-specific opportunities to enhance specialist and tradecraft capabilities. Examples include training and qualifications in investigations, compliance, analytics, national security policy, money laundering methodologies, strategic intelligence, criminology, telecommunications technology and information security training.
  • Leadership and management—We invest in developing our managers and leaders through our ACIC leadership programs such as the Leadership Summit and Bootcamp for the Brain. We have worked closely with the Home Affairs Portfolio and provided our managers and leaders with development opportunities through an executive leadership coaching program and leadership series. We also provide leadership and executive coaching opportunities through external programs, such as those delivered through the Australian Institute of Police Management, Australian Public Service Commission, National Security College, Australian and New Zealand School of Government, Australian Federal Police and the Women in Law Enforcement Strategy mentor program.

OUTCOMES

Staff collectively attended more than 2,378 training and development opportunities and events including core/business skills, coaching and mentoring, leadership and management, conferences/networking, specialist capability development (cyber, finance and international capability, as well as information and communications technologies, intelligence, investigations and psychology), induction and compliance. Examples include:

  • Criminal Intelligence Development Program—In partnership with the Australian Federal Police, we developed a joint criminal intelligence training and development continuum that is sequential in its delivery and tertiary-aligned. This followed two joint pilot programs of the Criminal Intelligence Development Program to develop skill levels of field collection operatives and intelligence analysts involved in the delivery of criminal intelligence. Both agencies assessed the pilots to be highly successful and a valuable basis for future development programs, which led to the development of the joint criminal intelligence training and development continuum. Over time, this will increase the quality of intelligence outputs across the tactical, operational and strategic spectrum, enhancing the effectiveness of Commonwealth, state and territory agencies operating in the criminal intelligence domain.
  • Management expertise and business skills—This year staff undertook management and core business development opportunities to enhance our workforce capability. These programs included:
    • Appearing before Parliamentary Committees
    • Learning Cabinet processes
    • Employment law reform
    • Writing skills for Government
    • Writing skills for intelligence professionals
    • Presentation and briefing skills
    • Certified IT security
    • Leadership and management
    • Project management
    • Training and assessment
    • Unconscious bias
    • Operational ICT systems.

EVALUATION

We conducted 110 evaluation processes for internal and external training and development programs. Our evaluation seeks to:

  • assess if we have met our intended objectives
  • achieve continuous improvement
  • assess whether resources are being used wisely
  • assess value for money.

TERTIARY STUDY SUPPORT PROGRAM

Our agency supported 19 eligible employees to undertake tertiary studies resulting in a Diploma qualification or higher in fields such as criminology, cybersecurity, fraud and financial crime, psychology, computing and law.

EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

We engage with staff to seek their views and increase their level of engagement by participating in the Australian Public Service Commission employee census. Results included:

  • Employee engagement—Staff believe strongly in the purpose and objectives of our agency, suggest ideas to improve our way of doing things and are happy to go the extra mile at work when required.
  • Inclusion and diversity—A total of 90 per cent of respondents said the people in their workgroup behave in an accepting manner towards people from diverse backgrounds and that their supervisor actively supports people from diverse backgrounds.
  • Workplace culture—Staff believe people in their work group treat each other with respect, they receive the respect they deserve and the agency encourages ethical behaviour.

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

We are committed to preventing injuries and exposure to hazards in the workplace, by taking all reasonably practicable steps to protect the health and safety of all workers at work, through identifying, eliminating and minimising hazards. Appendix C (from pages 231–234) details our 2017–18 work health and safety arrangements, initiatives, outcomes, statistics of accidents or dangerous occurrences and any investigations conducted.

Last updated
7 December 2018