Wastewater analysis https://www.acic.gov.au/ en Latest wastewater report builds on drug consumption data https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/latest-wastewater-report-builds-drug-consumption-data <span>Latest wastewater report builds on drug consumption data</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/7" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kate</span></span> <span>Fri, 2021-06-25 16:31</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2021-06-30T12:00:00Z">30 June 2021</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) today released the thirteenth report of its National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program (the Program). For the first time the report includes ketamine excretion levels.</p> <p>The thirteenth report presents data on Australia’s drug consumption for 12 substances, covering sampling in December 2020 (capital city and regional sites) and February 2021 (capital city sites). As with the two previous reports, wastewater analysis continues to provide unique insight into the impact of COVID-19 and related restrictions.</p> <p>The December 2020 collection covers around 56 per cent of Australia’s population—about 13.1 million Australians. Of the drugs measured by the Program with available dose data, alcohol and nicotine remain the most consumed drugs in Australia, with methylamphetamine the most consumed illicit drug.</p> <p>ACIC CEO Mr Michael Phelan APM said: “Understanding drug consumption at a population level supports effective allocation of resources to priority areas”.</p> <p>“It also allows the progress of demand, supply and harm reduction strategies to be monitored.”</p> <p>Reliable drug consumption data are a key indicator of the level of harm experienced by the community. The ACIC’s Program represents world’s best practice and is a vital tool for Government, law enforcement, health and other policy agencies.</p> <p>“This reporting period again demonstrated varying trends in drug consumption, both nationally and within our states and territories,” Mr Phelan said.</p> <p>During the current sampling period, average per capita regional methylamphetamine use fell below capital city levels for the first time since 2017.</p> <p><a>“In addition to the benefits of longitudinal analysis of drug trends, the Program is structured in a way ensures it can evolve in line with trends in drug markets.</a></p> <p>“This is why the ACIC has now added ketamine to the lists of substances monitored by the Program,” Mr Phelan said.</p> <p>Ketamine is a central nervous system depressant which is used as an anaesthetic and analgesic in medical and veterinary settings. It can also be used illicitly in its own right, or in combination with other substances.</p> <p>The report is available from the ACIC website: <a href="http://www.acic.gov.au">www.acic.gov.au</a></p> <p><strong>Note to editors </strong></p> <p>In accordance with current wastewater analysis conventions, the terms of the contract, and to protect the integrity of the Program, the exact sampling locations cannot be publicly released by the ACIC. To maintain the confidentiality of the participating site, each site was allocated a unique code to de-identify their results, however trends in particular states and territories can be identified.</p> <p><strong>Media contact</strong></p> <p>ACIC Media: 02 6268 7343</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> </div> Fri, 25 Jun 2021 06:31:54 +0000 Kate 779 at https://www.acic.gov.au Wastewater report shows increased drug consumption in Australia https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/wastewater-report-shows-increased-drug-consumption-australia-0 <span>Wastewater report shows increased drug consumption in Australia</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Wed, 2020-09-09 14:48</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2018-04-05T12:00:00Z">05 April 2018</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the fourth report of the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, revealing that of the illicit drugs tested, consumption of methylamphetamine and cocaine has increased across Australia.</p> <p>Nicotine and alcohol remain the highest consumed substances, with methylamphetamine remaining the highest consumed illicit drug in the country.</p> <p>The consumption of MDA and MDMA remains low and variable across sites. In general, heroin consumption was lower than the pharmaceutical opioids—fentanyl and oxycodone—with average regional consumption of fentanyl and oxycodone exceeding that in capital city sites.</p> <p>Minister for Law Enforcement and Cyber Security, the Hon. Angus Taylor MP, launched the report today alongside Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission Chief Executive Officer, Michael Phelan APM in Mandurah, Western Australia.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program continues to provide government, health and law enforcement agencies, and the community with a clear picture of drug consumption across Australia,” Mr Phelan said.</p> <p>“Our partners have used wastewater results to target locations for policy initiatives, testing the appropriateness of resource allocation and prioritisation decisions, and as a means of reliably and regularly measuring the demand for certain illicit commodities.</p> <p> “Analysis of wastewater data has enabled us to estimate the annual national consumption of methylamphetamine, cocaine, MDMA and heroin.</p> <p>“Such estimates can then be compared with other data, such as the weight of drugs seized by law enforcement, to further enrich our collective understanding of these drug markets and identify the most effective supply, demand and harm reduction measures.</p> <p> “The program is one of the best in the world, based on the number of substances tested, the frequency of testing, its breadth, depth and geographic scope and the longitudinal data it is generating.”</p> <p>The report covers 54 per cent of the population, which equates to about 12.7 million people. Population estimates have been refined in this report, which has increased the precision and accuracy of consumption estimates. This enables the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission and its partners to inform the most effective, targeted response to drug demand and supply—particularly in high-use areas.</p> <p>The fourth report contained data from all states and territories, enabling the program to provide a national picture of drug use. In this report, 45 wastewater treatment plants across Australia participated in the collection of wastewater samples, covering 12 substances. Samples were collected in October and December 2017.</p> <p>“We once again thank the operators of wastewater facilities across the country for participating in this national program,” Mr Phelan said.</p> <p>“As one of the only countries in the world where wastewater analysis receives full funding from the government, we are grateful to the Australian Government for allowing us to develop and share this picture of drug use in Australia.”</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program and has commissioned the University of Queensland, and through it the University of South Australia, to undertake the program and prepare the reports containing its findings. A total of nine public reports will be released over the three year period, with three reports released per annum.</p> <p>The report is available from the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission <a href="https://www.acic.gov.au/publications/intelligence-products/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-report">website</a>.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/media-release" hreflang="en">Media release</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Wed, 09 Sep 2020 04:48:08 +0000 Stephen 695 at https://www.acic.gov.au New highs for illicit drug seizures and arrests https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/new-highs-illicit-drug-seizures-and-arrests-0 <span>New highs for illicit drug seizures and arrests</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 13:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2016-08-04T12:00:00Z">04 August 2016</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The number of national illicit drug seizures and arrests has reached new highs, according to a report released today by the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC).</p> <p>In the 2014–15 financial year Australian law enforcement agencies made a record 105,862 national illicit drug seizures, weighing a total of 23.5 tonnes, with a record 133,926 national illicit drug arrests.</p> <p>The <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="c8c4ba40-d3f1-4dd5-8499-a12776dbbe31" href="/publications/illicit-drug-data-report/illicit-drug-data-report-2014-15" title="Illicit Drug Data Report 2014–15">Illicit Drug Data Report 2014–15 (IDDR)</a> is a statistical report which provides governments, law enforcement agencies and policy makers with a robust picture of the Australian illicit drug market. It pulls together data from all state and territory police agencies, the Australian Federal Police, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection/Australian Border Force and forensic laboratories.</p> <p>Minister for Justice, the Hon. Michael Keenan MP launched the report alongside ACIC Chief Executive Officer, Mr Chris Dawson, in Adelaide.</p> <p>“This year, for the first time, the IDDR includes data from wastewater analysis,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>“Wastewater analysis is recognised internationally and increasingly in Australia, as being the most effective, and arguably the only objective means of reliably measuring the level of use of a number of prominent illicit drugs.”</p> <p>The agency recently received $3.6 million from Proceeds of Crime funding over a three year period to fund a national pilot wastewater analysis program. This program will provide leading-edge, coordinated national research and intelligence on illicit drugs, with a specific focus on methylamphetamine.</p> <p>“The data obtained from wastewater analysis will provide law enforcement, policy, regulatory and health agencies with additional and more objective data in relation to the usage of methylamphetamine and other drugs,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>“While illicit drug statistics do fluctuate from year to year, when looking at the last decade of statistics, the number and weight of national seizures, as well as the number of national illicit drug arrests have dramatically increased.”</p> <p>“Australian law enforcement is disrupting more criminals and seizing more illicit drugs than ever before.”</p> <p>“The statistics in the IDDR will inform prioritisation and decision-making to help protect Australia and minimise the threat, harm and destruction caused by illicit drugs,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p><a id="_GoBack"></a>The Illicit Drug Data Report 2014–15 is available <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="c8c4ba40-d3f1-4dd5-8499-a12776dbbe31" href="/publications/illicit-drug-data-report/illicit-drug-data-report-2014-15" title="Illicit Drug Data Report 2014–15">online</a>.</p> <h2>Key findings from Illicit Drug Data Report 2014–15</h2> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>The number of national illicit drug seizures increased 13.7 per cent, from 93,086 in 2013–14 to a record 105,862 in 2014–15.</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>The weight of illicit drugs seized nationally decreased 13.9 per cent, from 27.3 tonnes in 2013–14 to 23.5 tonnes in 2014–15.</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>The number of national illicit drug arrests increased 19.5 per cent, from 112,049 in 2013–14 to a record 133,926 in 2014–15.</strong></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>​​​​​​​</p> <ul> <li>With the exception of other and unknown, not elsewhere classified drugs<a href="https://www.acic.gov.au/#_ftn1" id="_ftnref1">[1]</a>, the number of national illicit drug seizures increased across all illicit drug categories.</li> <li>For a second time in the last decade, ATS accounted for the greatest proportion of the weight of illicit drugs seized nationally in 2014–15.</li> <li>The number of national illicit drug arrests increased across all illicit drug categories in 2014–15.</li> <li>The threat posed by Amphetamine Type Stimulants (ATS) remains high, with national seizures and arrests associated with these drugs the highest on record.</li> <li>Cannabis and other and unknown, not elsewhere classified drugs were the only two illicit drug categories to report a decrease in the weight of drugs seized nationally in 2014–15, decreasing 15.1 per cent and 81.8 per cent<a href="https://www.acic.gov.au/#_ftn2" id="_ftnref2">[2]</a> respectively.</li> <li>For the first time the IDDR contains wastewater data on methylamphetamine, MDMA and cocaine, with reporting indicating that methylamphetamine use in the community has been increasing since 2009–10.</li> <li>Although the proportion of national arrests related to cannabis has decreased in recent years, cannabis continues to account for the greatest proportion of national illicit drug arrests.</li> <li>In 2014–15, the weight of national other opioid seizures increased 2,417.1 per cent, with a record 740 kilograms seized.</li> <li>The 667 clandestine laboratories detected nationally in 2014–15 is the lowest number reported since 2008–09.</li> </ul> <p><a href="https://www.acic.gov.au/#_ftnref1" id="_ftn1">[1]</a> Data for national other and unknown not elsewhere classified (NEC) drug seizures and arrests capture those drugs and substances outside the specific drug categories contained in the IDDR. This category covers a range of substances including precursors, anaesthetics, new psychoactive substances, pharmaceuticals and drugs not elsewhere classified.</p> <p><a href="https://www.acic.gov.au/#_ftnref2" id="_ftn2">[2]</a> The considerable decrease in the weight of drugs seized within this category is largely due to a single 10 tonne seizure of benzaldehyde in 2013–14.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/organised-crime" hreflang="en">Organised crime</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 03:16:50 +0000 Stephen 560 at https://www.acic.gov.au National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Pilot Program underway https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-pilot-program-underway <span>National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Pilot Program underway</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 12:30</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2016-10-31T12:00:00Z">31 October 2016</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC), the Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences (QAEHS) at The University of Queensland and the University of South Australia have formally commenced a partnership to undertake the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Pilot Program.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Pilot Program is a key initiative in establishing an objective evidence base on illicit and licit drug use,” ACIC Chief Executive Officer, Mr Chris Dawson said.</p> <p>“Signing the contract signifies that work is now underway to better detect and monitor the level and type of drug use across 50 sites within Australia.</p> <p>“The proposed breakdown by state includes 11 sites in Queensland, nine in South Australia, eight in New South Wales, seven in Western Australia, six in Victoria, five in Tasmania, three in the Northern Territory and one in the Australian Capital Territory.</p> <p> “Wastewater analysis is an innovative approach used both domestically and internationally to detect and monitor drug use. It provides a measure, rather than an estimate, of the use of a number of illicit drugs, as well as licit drugs including nicotine, alcohol and some pharmaceuticals.</p> <p>“QAEHS and the University of South Australia have proven experience in wastewater analysis, which is arguably the only objective means of reliably measuring the level of illicit drugs being used by members of the community,” Mr Chris Dawson said.</p> <p>“The illicit drug market remains the principal source of profit for organised crime and continues to be a key focus for law enforcement in Australia.</p> <p>“This data will provide law enforcement, policy, regulatory and health agencies with additional and more objective data in relation to drug use across Australia,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>In June 2016 the agency received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for a national wastewater drug monitoring pilot program. This program will provide leading-edge, coordinated national research and intelligence on illicit drugs, with a specific focus on ice.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 02:30:21 +0000 Stephen 544 at https://www.acic.gov.au Tapping into wastewater for a national picture of drug consumption https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/tapping-wastewater-national-picture-drug-consumption <span>Tapping into wastewater for a national picture of drug consumption</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-26T12:00:00Z">26 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, revealing that of the substances analysed methylamphetamine is the highest consumed illicit drug across all regions of Australia.</p> <p>Minister for Justice, the Hon. Michael Keenan MP launched the report alongside ACIC Chief Executive Officer, Mr Chris Dawson, in Perth.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program uses wastewater analysis to capture comprehensive and reliable data on drug consumption across Australia,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>“These results are integral in shaping a whole of government and whole of community response to the demand of illicit drugs in Australia, and the harms to our community,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>“With serious and organised crime driving supply trends, and resilient user demand, the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission is committed to working with our partners to better understand the threat, the role of serious and organised crime in the problem and the need to collectively work on effective responses.</p> <p>“Improving the data sources available for the central analysis of illicit drug trends is a critical step in this process.”</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, and has commissioned the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia to undertake the program and prepare the first report containing its findings.</p> <p>The report found that methylamphetamine consumption in Western Australia and South Australia was higher than the national average.</p> <p>Compared with methylamphetamine, the report found that usage of other illicit stimulants, particularly cocaine and MDMA, was generally much lower.</p> <p>The report also measured usage levels of oxycodone and fentanyl, noting that wastewater analysis cannot distinguish between licit and illicit use. The report found considerable levels of consumption of both substances across the nation, which is worthy of further investigation because of the potential for diversion to the illicit market.</p> <p>The report confirmed assessments that new psychoactive substances occupy a niche market where consumption is far less than traditional drug markets.</p> <p>Alcohol and tobacco were consistently the highest consumed tested substances in all states and territories.</p> <p>The report is available from the <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1cf85508-cd99-4177-929d-c53b445ed4e0" href="/publications/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-reports" title="National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports">Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission website.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:45:13 +0000 Stephen 530 at https://www.acic.gov.au ACT wastewater drug monitoring findings https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/act-wastewater-drug-monitoring-findings <span>ACT wastewater drug monitoring findings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-26T12:00:00Z">26 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, revealing that the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) had one of the lowest methylamphetamine consumption levels nationwide.</p> <p>Methylamphetamine was the highest consumed illicit drug of those tested across all regions of Australia including the ACT, with consumption in some areas at historic highs.</p> <p>There was one test site in the ACT, with oxycodone and fentanyl being among the highest consumed drugs.</p> <p>“This is an interesting finding as we are aware of the diversion of prescription medications such as fentanyl and oxycodone from the legitimate market to the illicit market, however wastewater analysis cannot currently measure if use of these substances is licit or illicit,” Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission CEO Chris Dawson said.</p> <p>“Findings on consumption of fentanyl and oxycodone are a concern for their potential diversion into the illicit drug market, and we will be working with our partners to understand these results as the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reveals trends and patterns over time.”</p> <p>In the ACT, fentanyl consumption exceeds oxycodone consumption.</p> <p>While cocaine consumption in capital city sites in New South Wales dominated the national landscape, the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory capital city site showed substantially higher cocaine consumption compared to other states.</p> <p>“The data we will obtain through ongoing wastewater analysis will inform operational and policy responses to illicit drugs and drugs that can be abused.</p> <p>“This program provides government, law enforcement, and health agencies with an objective evidence base and a timely and regular measure of drug use and emerging trends.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program results are integral in shaping a whole of government and whole of community response to the demand for illicit drugs in Australia, and the harms drugs bring to the community,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, and has commissioned the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia to undertake the program and prepare the first research report containing its findings.</p> <p>The report is available from the <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1cf85508-cd99-4177-929d-c53b445ed4e0" href="/publications/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-reports" title="National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports">Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission website</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:44:08 +0000 Stephen 529 at https://www.acic.gov.au NSW wastewater drug monitoring findings https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/nsw-wastewater-drug-monitoring-findings <span>NSW wastewater drug monitoring findings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:42</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-26T12:00:00Z">26 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, with cocaine consumption in New South Wales capital city sites dominating the national landscape for that drug.</p> <p>“While methylamphetamine was the highest consumed illicit drug of those tested across all regions of Australia, findings show cocaine usage in Australia is mostly centred in New South Wales across ten capital city and regional sites,” said Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission CEO Chris Dawson.</p> <p>“Cocaine use is highest in New South Wales by some margin—being almost double the second highest jurisdiction in terms of doses consumed per day.</p> <p>“The findings from the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report are a baseline that will be built upon in subsequent reports to uncover a national picture of drug consumption,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>The findings also complement the existing datasets on the supply of and demand for drugs in Australia.</p> <p>“Our Illicit Drug Data Report 2014–15 found that New South Wales accounted for the greatest proportion of national cocaine seizures, with 62.3 per cent of the number and 81.1 per cent of the weight of cocaine seized in 2014–15.</p> <p>“These findings, combined with the results of the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, drive home the need for a greater focus on demand reduction, as our law enforcement agencies continue to focus on reducing supply,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>Data from participating New South Wales sites also found:</p> <ul> <li>consumption levels of fentanyl, a prescription medication with <strong>potential</strong> for diversion into the illicit drug market, were high in certain New South Wales regional centres.</li> <li>the synthetic stimulants mephedrone and methylone were detected, however, the quantity of the substances was mostly below the level at which it could reliably be quantified.</li> <li>tobacco consumption was below the national average.</li> </ul> <p>“This program provides government, law enforcement, and health agencies with an objective evidence base and a timely and regular measure of drug use and emerging trends.”</p> <p>“The results contained in the first report are integral in shaping a whole of government and whole of community response to the demand for illicit drugs in Australia, and the harms drugs bring to the community,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, and has commissioned the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia to undertake the program and prepare the first research report containing its findings.</p> <p>The report is available from the <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1cf85508-cd99-4177-929d-c53b445ed4e0" href="/publications/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-reports" title="National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports">Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission website.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:42:50 +0000 Stephen 528 at https://www.acic.gov.au NT wastewater drug monitoring findings https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/nt-wastewater-drug-monitoring-findings <span>NT wastewater drug monitoring findings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-26T12:00:00Z">26 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, with two sites in the Northern Territory providing a high-level snapshot of drug consumption in the territory.</p> <p>“Of these sites, results indicate a high demand for both methylamphetamine and MDMA in the capital city catchment, while levels of cocaine consumption in regional NT were the lowest across all participating jurisdictions,” Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission CEO Chris Dawson said.</p> <p> “Nationally, alcohol and tobacco were consistently the highest consumed tested substances in all states and territories, and the two Northern Territory sites showed the highest average per capita consumption for both substances,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program measures the use of illicit drugs and some licit drugs in the community by chemically analysing sewerage water.</p> <p>“The first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report provides a baseline for the quantity of drugs being consumed, which will be built upon in future reports.”</p> <p>“Data obtained over the life of the program will highlight communities with high drug usage, the drug types that are most common and emerging geographic drug markets.</p> <p>“The initial findings in the Northern Territory indicate a strong demand for both licit and illicit substances, and we will be working with our partners to understand these results as the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reveals trends and patterns over time,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program results are integral in shaping a whole of government and whole of community response to the demand for illicit drugs in Australia, and the harms drugs bring to the community,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, and has commissioned the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia to undertake the program and prepare the first research report containing its findings.</p> <p>The report is available from the <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1cf85508-cd99-4177-929d-c53b445ed4e0" href="/publications/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-reports" title="National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports">Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission website</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:41:31 +0000 Stephen 527 at https://www.acic.gov.au QLD wastewater drug monitoring findings https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/qld-wastewater-drug-monitoring-findings <span>QLD wastewater drug monitoring findings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:40</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-26T12:00:00Z">26 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, which found several regional sites in Queensland had per capita methylamphetamine consumption levels that exceeded the national average.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program measures the use of drugs in the community by chemically analysing sewerage water, with the first report capturing a baseline assessment of drug consumption in Australia,” Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission CEO Chris Dawson said. </p> <p>Methylamphetamine was the highest consumed illicit drug of those tested across all regions of Australia, with consumption in some areas at historic highs.</p> <p>Wastewater analysis has been used to measure drug use in certain parts of Queensland for a number of years, providing the baseline for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program to build upon.</p> <p>“Wastewater analysis in Queensland for at least the last five years has shown a consistent pattern of increasing methylamphetamine consumption, and in two Queensland regional sites, results show an increase each year, and in recent years, at an increasing rate.”</p> <p>“We already know that serious and organised crime groups are thriving on the profits generated through methylamphetamine and other illicit substances, with the price paid for meth in Australia among the highest in the world.”</p> <p>“Our law enforcement partners are working hard to combat illicit drug supply,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>Historical data for cocaine is available for one Queensland regional site since 2009, with data revealing that although use in the location is high in national terms, consumption levels within that site have remained relatively stable over the period.</p> <p>Alcohol and tobacco were consistently the highest consumed drugs of those tested in all states and territories.</p> <p>Regional Queensland, in particular, also showed significant oxycodone and fentanyl use—these substances have potential for diversion into the illicit drug market.</p> <p> </p> <p> “The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program results are integral in shaping a whole of government and whole of community response to the demand for illicit drugs in Australia, and the harms to our community,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>“The impact of illicit drug use on our society should not be underestimated, and with serious and organised crime driving supply trends, along with resilient user demand, the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission is committed to working with our partners to better understand the threat, the role of serious and organised crime in the problem and the need to collectively work on effective responses.</p> <p>“Improving the data sources available for the central analysis of illicit drug trends is a critical step in this process.”</p> <p>Twelve sites across Queensland were monitored as part of the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program.</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, and has commissioned the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia to undertake the program and prepare the first research report containing its findings.</p> <p>The report is available from the <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1cf85508-cd99-4177-929d-c53b445ed4e0" href="/publications/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-reports" title="National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports">Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission website.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:40:12 +0000 Stephen 526 at https://www.acic.gov.au Victoria wastewater drug monitoring findings https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/victoria-wastewater-drug-monitoring-findings-1 <span>Victoria wastewater drug monitoring findings</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:34</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-26T12:00:00Z">26 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has today released the first National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report, revealing high levels of methylamphetamine are being consumed in Victoria.</p> <p>Methylamphetamine was the highest consumed illicit drug of those tested across all regions of Australia, with consumption in some areas at historic highs.</p> <p>“Methylamphetamine consumption is a national issue due to the high demand for this illicit substance, and the impact of illicit drug use on our society should not be underestimated.”</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program Report findings provide a baseline that will be built upon in subsequent reports to uncover a national picture of drug consumption,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>The findings also complement the existing datasets on the supply of and demand for drugs in Australia.</p> <p>“Our Illicit Drug Data Report 2015–16 showed that methylamphetamine was a major national issue, and Victoria is no exception, 37.3 per cent of illicit drug arrests related to amphetamine-type stimulants—the highest proportion reported by any state or territory in 2014–15.</p> <p>“We know that serious and organised crime is driving supply trends, and there is resilient user demand, so our law enforcement agencies are working hard to combat the supply side of this illicit market.</p> <p>“The National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program results drive home the need for a whole of government and whole of community response to the demand for illicit drugs in Australia, and the harms brought to our community,” Mr Dawson said.</p> <p>Alcohol and tobacco were consistently the highest consumed tested substances in all states and territories, with levels of consumption in regional Victoria exceeding consumption in Victorian capital city sites.</p> <p>The prescription medication oxycodone was detected in all jurisdictions, with consumption in regional Victoria significantly higher than other jurisdictions and the national average.</p> <p>“We are aware of the diversion of prescription medications such as oxycodone from the legitimate market to the illicit market, however wastewater analysis cannot distinguish between licit and illicit use of these substances,” Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission CEO Chris Dawson said.</p> <p>“Findings on consumption of oxycodone are a concern for their potential diversion into the illicit drug market, and we will be working with our partners to understand these results as the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reveals trends and patterns over time.”</p> <p>Seven sites across Victoria were included in the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program.</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission received $3.6 million over three years from Proceeds of Crime funding for the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, and has commissioned the University of Queensland and the University of South Australia to undertake the program and prepare the first research report containing its findings.</p> <p>The report is available from the <a data-entity-substitution="canonical" data-entity-type="node" data-entity-uuid="1cf85508-cd99-4177-929d-c53b445ed4e0" href="/publications/national-wastewater-drug-monitoring-program-reports" title="National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports">Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission website.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/wastewater-analysis" hreflang="en">Wastewater analysis</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:34:17 +0000 Stephen 525 at https://www.acic.gov.au