Cybercrime https://www.acic.gov.au/ en World-wide week-of-action targeting money mules https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/world-wide-week-action-targeting-money-mules <span>World-wide week-of-action targeting money mules</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Wed, 2020-08-12 16:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-11-29T12:00:00Z">29 November 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-joint-release-with field--type-string field--label-hidden field--item">Australian Border Force, Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, Australian Federal Police, Australian Transactions and Reporting Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC)</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Border Force, Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, Australian Federal Police, Australian Transactions and Reporting Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC)</p> <p>In support of the European Money Mule week of action, the Australian Federal Police (AFP), Australian Border Force (ABF), Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) and Australian Transaction Reports Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC) conducted intelligence gathering and analysis activities last week (20-24 November).  </p> <p>Money mules are the middlemen for criminals who have obtained funds by online banking fraud through phishing or hacking. The criminals need a mule to launder the funds obtained as a result of illegal activities. After being recruited by the fraudsters, money mules receive funds into their bank accounts and then they withdraw the money and send it to a designated account (domestic or offshore), using a wire transfer service, minus a commission payment.</p> <p>Across Australia, police gathered valuable information through approximately 60 door-knocking interviews with persons at risk of being targeted by criminals for money mule activities.  This activity occurred in Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania, coinciding with operational activity around Europe with 26 countries participating in the simultaneous week-of-action.</p> <p>Internationally, the European Money Mule week of action saw more than 1700 fraudulent transactions reported, 766 money mules identified and 59 money mule recruiters identified.</p> <p>AFP National Manager Neil Gaughan said criminals may use online chat rooms, social networking sites, post hoax websites, fake advertisements and fake profiles to recruit mules and try to persuade people to take part in illegal activity.</p> <p>“The funds the criminals need transferred are often the proceeds of fraud and the persons who participate in these scams as the money mules are effectively laundering the proceeds of crime.</p> <p>“Criminals target members of the community to carry out their laundering activities, sometimes unwittingly. Along with intelligence gathering, the 60 door-knocking interviews provided police the opportunity to raise awareness of the types of tricks and scams criminals will use to recruit money mules.</p> <p>“We rely on the support from the community and our law enforcement partners to help bring to justice these criminals preying on vulnerable members of our community,” Assistant Commissioner Gaughan said.</p> <p>Acting Assistant Commissioner, Strategic Border Command, James Watson said the ABF continues to target money mules and the syndicates they may work for. </p> <p>“Currency over $10,000 including cash, stored value cards or cheques must be declared at the border on both arrival and departure. Our officers have sophisticated means of detecting currency including using x-ray, detector dogs and physical inspections,” Acting Assistant Commissioner Watson said.</p> <p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission Cybercrime Intelligence Hub Manager Charlotte Wood said the ACIC provided intelligence to support the AFP on over 30 persons of interest during the week of action.</p> <p>“The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission is concerned about individuals in Australia cashing out the proceeds of cybercrime, with money mules being one of the main methods for laundering criminal proceeds.</p> <p>“Cybercrime disruption remains a major focus for Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, and with ongoing collaboration with our domestic and international law enforcement partners, we will continue to frustrate cybercriminals’ ability to launder money out of the country, making Australia a less attractive target.”</p> <p>AUSTRAC National Manager Intelligence Dr John Moss said, “AUSTRAC is working closely with law enforcement and international partners by providing financial intelligence, including working with industry via our Fintel Alliance partnerships, to help identify and track down entities that are directly controlling mule networks”.</p> <p>Following the tips below can prevent involvement in criminal activity:</p> <ul> <li>Be cautious about unsolicited offers or opportunities offering you the chance of making easy money;</li> <li>Be wary of offers from people or companies overseas as it makes it harder to check if they are legitimate;</li> <li>Take steps to verify any company which makes you a job offer, for example, address, phone number, email address and website. You could check if it is a registered company in Australia;</li> <li>Never give your confidential banking details to anyone;</li> <li>Always guard your personal information and be suspicious if someone asks for personal details soon after contact;</li> <li>Be wary of a person asking for financial assistance – never send money, particularly by wire transfer as these funds cannot be recovered by banks; and</li> <li>Be cautious of someone asking for details of your financial status – do not provide the information.</li> <li>If you have received money in your bank account, transferred or attempted to transfer money overseas, please immediately contact your bank or financial institution. You could be at risk of having your identity stolen by these criminals and your bank account drained of savings.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Media enquiries</strong><br /> AFP Media: 02 6131 6333</p> <p>ABF Media: 02 6264 2244</p> <p>ACIC Media: 02 6268 7343</p> <p>AUSTRAC Media: 02 9950 0488</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/cybercrime" hreflang="en">Cybercrime</a></div> </div> Wed, 12 Aug 2020 06:16:49 +0000 Stephen 604 at https://www.acic.gov.au International operation targets users of Darknet marketplace https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/international-operation-targets-users-darknet-marketplace <span>International operation targets users of Darknet marketplace</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 12:28</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2016-11-01T12:00:00Z">01 November 2016</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>ACT Policing, Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, Australian Federal Police, Department of Immigration and Border Protection, New South Wales Police Force, Northern Territory Police, Queensland Police Service, South Australia Police, Tasmania Police, Victoria Police, Western Australia Police</p> <p>People using Darknet sites to source and deal in illicit drugs and other illegal items have been targeted by multiple law enforcement agencies in a global week of action.</p> <p>International partners include agencies from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, New Ze<a id="_GoBack"></a>aland, France, Finland and the Netherlands.</p> <p>The ‘Darknet Period of Action’ was initiated to develop a more unified global law enforcement response to the growing use of Darknet sites to buy and sell illicit goods and services.  </p> <p>The ‘Darknet Period of Action’ in Australia last week involved the Australian Federal Police (AFP), Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC), Australian Border Force (ABF) and state and territory police services.</p> <p>The operation involved activity across every state and territory in Australia with a total of 11 search warrants executed resulting in four arrests and six summons issued.  Illicit substances discovered during search warrant activity included MDMA, steroids, cannabis, opium, cocaine and methylamphetamine. Operational activity to target Darknet activity will continue over the coming weeks.</p> <p>While illegal drugs continue to be the most common item purchased and sold on the Darknet, law enforcement agencies around the world are also seeing a wide range of illicit materials such as weapons, fake identities and prescription drugs, as well as illegal services such as money laundering being offered for sale.</p> <p>AFP Assistant Commissioner Ian McCartney, National Manager Organised Crime and Cyber, said the belief that the Darknet was an anonymous part of the internet was not correct.</p> <p>“While it is not an offence to access such sites, the purchase and importation of illicit goods and services is.” </p> <p>“Last week’s actions demonstrate that law enforcement agencies across the globe are working collaboratively to identify and apprehend those individuals using illicit Darknet sites.”</p> <p>To combat the movement of illicit materials into Australia, Australian Border Force officers examined approximately 57.5 million mail articles last financial year.</p> <p>ABF Assistant Commissioner Strategic Border Command, Clive Murray, said the operation was another example of the real-world consequences of buying illicit items online.</p> <p>“The ABF and our partner agencies are well aware of Darknet websites and their use as a virtual trading venue for illicit goods,” said Assistant Commissioner Murray.</p> <p>“At some point, all goods sourced internationally must cross the border and the ABF has the capability to target and detect these goods – no matter what it is.”</p> <p>ACIC Executive Director Intelligence, Col Blanch, said that a range of Australian agencies monitor illicit e-commerce platforms, working closely with international partner agencies.</p> <p>“If you are thinking of engaging in illegal activity through these websites, there is no guarantee you will remain anonymous, and you will be prosecuted,” Mr Blanch said.</p> <p><strong>Note</strong> – Footage of ABF officers inspecting mail items at international mail centres can be found at:<a href="http://scanmail.trustwave.com/?c=1460&amp;d=5NSX2NpcVg-18MmPvWB85f9bICOjLaGYYt66hvJ36Q&amp;u=http%3a%2f%2fnewsroom%2eborder%2egov%2eau%2fvideos%2fdarknet-week-of-action">http://newsroom.border.gov.au/videos/darknet-week-of-action</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/cybercrime" hreflang="en">Cybercrime</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/illicit-drugs" hreflang="en">Illicit drugs</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/firearms" hreflang="en">Firearms</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 02:28:01 +0000 Stephen 542 at https://www.acic.gov.au It’s time to #askoutloud about cyber safety https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/its-time-askoutloud-about-cyber-safety <span>It’s time to #askoutloud about cyber safety</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 12:18</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-02-07T12:00:00Z">07 February 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) is a proud partner of Safer Internet Day 2017.</p> <p>ACIC CEO Chris Dawson said the ACIC actively works to disrupt cybercriminals who try to make a profit from everyday Australians.</p> <p>“Safer Internet Day provides a timely reminder for all Australians to watch out for common online scams—particularly suspicious messages on email, SMS, social media and mobile messaging apps,” said Mr Dawson.</p> <p>“If you are connected to the internet, you are vulnerable to cybercriminals looking to exploit technology.”</p> <p>“If you receive a message that seems out of the ordinary, or doesn’t look right, ask out loud and get a second opinion from a friend before responding or opening a link.”</p> <p>The ACIC contributes insights, awareness and intelligence on cybercrime threats for further investigations by law enforcement partners.</p> <p>“In addition to our operational work on cybercrime, we are also responsible for the administration of the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network,” said Mr Dawson.</p> <p>The Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN) allows the public to easily report instances of cybercrime, and also provides advice to help people recognise and avoid common types of cybercrime.</p> <p>The community, through reporting cybercrime via ACORN can also contribute to the collaborative effort of combating cybercrime.</p> <p>You can learn more about how to protect yourself on line by going to the ACORN website (<a href="http://www.acorn.gov.au/">www.acorn.gov.au</a>) and the Stay Smart Online Website (<a href="http://www.staysmartonline.gov.au/">www.staysmartonline.gov.au</a>).</p> <p>You can also check out the #askoutloud <a href="https://www.staysmartonline.gov.au/sso-week/resources">resources</a>, including social media graphics and printable posters.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/cybercrime" hreflang="en">Cybercrime</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 02:18:35 +0000 Stephen 534 at https://www.acic.gov.au Discussing Australia’s cybercrime threat landscape https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/discussing-australias-cybercrime-threat-landscape <span>Discussing Australia’s cybercrime threat landscape</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:46</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-03-15T12:00:00Z">15 March 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission</p> <p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) Cybercrime Intelligence Manager, Ms Charlotte Wood, gave a presentation today at the Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC) 2017 Conference.</p> <p>Ms Wood spoke to attendees about the cybercrime threat landscape in Australia.</p> <p>The ACIC actively works to disrupt cybercriminals who try to make a profit from everyday Australians. The estimated cost of cybercrime to Australia in the 2013–14 financial year was $1.1 billion.</p> <p>Ms Wood defined cybercrime as an intrusion on a computer, system or network for a financial motivation.</p> <p>“The ACIC’s role in combating cybercrime is to discover and prioritise, understand the criminal networks and enhance response strategies by working closely with partners,” said Ms Wood.</p> <p>“These partners include other law enforcement agencies and the intelligence community, both domestically and internationally.”</p> <p>Ms Wood highlighted that the cybercrime impacting Australia continues to originate offshore. She gave examples of recent malware and ransomware incidents to demonstrate the impact that cybercrime is having on our community, economy, and national security.</p> <p>Ms Wood also examined business email compromise, which is being quantified for the first time in Australia through the <a href="https://www.acorn.gov.au/">Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network</a> (ACORN).</p> <p>The ACORN allows the public to easily report instances of cybercrime, and also provides advice to help people recognise and avoid common types of cybercrime.</p> <p> “The most common method of business email compromise is imitating or compromising a company executive’s email, and requesting an urgent funds transfer,” Ms Wood explained.</p> <p>“Reports of business email compromise in Australia have increased since the inception of ACORN in late 2014.</p> <p>“There were 749 cases reported in the 2015–16 financial year and 243 reported cases within the first quarter of 2016–17.”</p> <p>Ms Wood explained that cybercrime exploits the ability to operate internationally, as countering cyber threats requires the global collaboration of private sector, law enforcement and intelligence agencies.</p> <p>The ACIC exchanges information and intelligence nationally and internationally to create a richer picture of current and emerging threats and risks.</p> <p>More information about the ACSC Conference can be found online: <a href="https://acsc2017.com.au/">https://acsc2017.com.au/</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/cybercrime" hreflang="en">Cybercrime</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:46:18 +0000 Stephen 531 at https://www.acic.gov.au Pair arrested over 'fake trader' websites https://www.acic.gov.au/media-centre/media-releases-and-statements/pair-arrested-over-fake-trader-websites <span>Pair arrested over &#039;fake trader&#039; websites</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Stephen</span></span> <span>Tue, 2020-08-11 11:06</span> <div class="field field--name-field-release-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field--item"><time datetime="2017-06-28T12:00:00Z">28 June 2017</time> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission, Queensland Police Service</p> <p>Queensland State Crime Command’s Financial and Cyber Crimes Group has arrested a man and a woman after conducting protracted investigation into a number of “fake trader” websites that have claimed a significant number of Queensland victims.</p> <p>Operation Papa Caffeine was commenced with the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) when an increased spike of fake trading websites was detected through the Australian Cyber Online Reporting Network (ACORN).</p> <p>A subsequent reconciliation of ACORN reports from January 2016 to May 2017 identified over 200 complainants (Australia wide) concerning some 28 separate ‘fake trader’ websites.</p> <p>It was alleged at the time that in excess of $252,000 had been defrauded.</p> <p>The websites themselves appeared legitimate and advertised the heavily discounted sale of outdoor furniture, BBQs, outboard marine motors and fitness equipment.</p> <p>It will be alleged that people wishing to purchase these items were asked to provide credit card details however were also offered a further discount if payment was made via direct bank to bank transfers.</p> <p>Upon making payment, victims were allegedly emailed ‘invoices’ concerning their purchases and advised of a future date of delivery.</p> <p>It will be further alleged that no items were delivered and customers attempting to re-contact the websites discovered either the contact numbers had been disconnected and their emails were not replied to.</p> <p>A total of 45 victims to date have been identified in Queensland having been defrauded via ‘fake trader’ websites and depositing approximately $60,000.</p> <ul> <li>A 27-year-old Latvian national man living in Norman Park was arrested and had over 45 charges preferred by detectives including multiple counts of fraud and two counts of money laundering.</li> <li>A 25-year-old Latvian Female residing at Norman Park was arrested and had over 35 charges preferred by detectives including multiple counts of fraud.</li> </ul> <p>Fraud and Cyber Crime Detective Superintendent Peter Brewer praised the work of detectives and the community.</p> <p>“This arrest was the result of information provided to us by members of the public through the ACORN reporting system and we continue to encourage anyone who is effected by Cyber Crime offences to report the information on the ACORN system,” Detective Superintendent Brewer said.</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/acorn" hreflang="en">ACORN</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/subject/cybercrime" hreflang="en">Cybercrime</a></div> </div> Tue, 11 Aug 2020 01:06:46 +0000 Stephen 503 at https://www.acic.gov.au